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Their Komatsu skid steer got to be a hero when executives of the Swagelok Company called Sayre for help last winter. The company had taken delivery of a new Gulfstream G6 at the Cuyahoga Airport but piles of plowed snow were blocking the way and they couldnt get the jet into the hangar. The Sayres used the CK30 to push back the snow piles. Its funny how a dumb little skid steer saved the day for a mega-million-dollar jet Sayre said with a laugh. Around Mantua the Sayres are also known for the July 4th party they hold for local first responders customers and community members. Chucks wife Shannon came up with the idea to hold a party for local police and fire- fighters after 911. The first one drew a couple dozen people and ended with fireworks. Since then it has grown every year with about 500 attending in 2015 for a meal and professional fireworks show. Theres no alcohol its a party you can bring your family to and Dad encourages everyone to get familiar with the heli- copter especially the kids Sayre said. That family feeling is important to the Sayres. We work with developers we have worked with for 30 years. My customers are my family Sayre said. Thats one of the things I like about Columbus Equipment Company. They treat me like Im family. Its rare to find that kind of relationship in todays world. The Sayre crew is rarely still. A Kubota RTV900 utility vehicle allows speedy transit from one location to the nextand improved productivitywhether its on the Sayre Farm or a Sayre Construction jobsite. 7 Thats one of the things I like about Columbus Equipment Company. They treat me like Im family. Its rare to find that kind of relationship in todays world. Chuck Sayre VP Sayre Construction Sayre Farms and Sayre Helicopter Did You Know Sayre Helicopter is the only helicopter aerial sprayer still in business in Ohio. In the 1960s and 70s when Ohio farmers grew vegetables spraying was big busi- ness because vegetables had to be sprayed weekly. When those farmers switched to corn and soybeans the need for aerial spraying dwindled. In the last decade the industry has seen somewhat of a resurgence because of a new corn fungicide that is applied when corn is too tall for ground-based spraying. Stan Sayre got into spraying around 1970 when a spraying company didnt fulfill its contract and he lost his entire potato crop. Stan decided to do his spraying himself. He had a passion for flying so he learned how to fly and taught himself how to do aerial spraying said his son Chuck. Within a few years other farmers were asking him to spray their corps so he upgraded to a commercial license and went into business. Helicopters which fly at slower speeds than planes are typically used to spray more compact or hard-to- reach fields of under 100 acres.